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Course Offerings

FALL 2017

Comparative and World Literature

CWL 395. Terrorism in Fiction and Film

Same as JS 399. (Rachel Harris)

Hebrew

HEBR 201. Elementary Modern Hebrew I

Acquaints students with the fundamental principles of the Hebrew language. Develops all four language skills; reading, writing, listening and speaking. Grammar and comprehension are exercised through the textbook, the audio-visual materials and the computer. Easy stories will be used during the term to strengthen reading comprehension. Participation in the language laboratory is required. (Sara Feldman)

HEBR 403. Intermediate Modern Hebrew I

Advanced examination of the fundamental principles of the Hebrew language. Develops all four language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. Grammar and comprehension are exercised through the textbooks, the audio-visual materials and the computer. Examples of Hebrew fiction, largely easy stories, will be used during the term to strengthen reading comprehension. Participation in the language laboratory is required. Open to Freshmen. Students that have not taken HEBR 202 must take the Hebrew placement-proficiency examination and consult the Hebrew coordinator prior to registration, or the Hebrew advisor at registration, for assignment to a lecture-discussion section. (Sara Feldman)

History

HIST 252. The Holocaust

Exploration of the Holocaust in historical perspective by examining European anti-Semitism, political developments in Germany, the rise to power of the Nazis, and the origins of the Holocaust with first-hand accounts, films, and historical texts, concluding with the legacy of the Holocaust in the contemporary world. Same as JS 252. (Peter Fritzsche)

HIST 355. Soviet Jewish History

An examination of how Jewish life and culture contributed to the creation of the world's first socialist society. Makes use of primary sources, scholarly essays and monographs, archival documents, literature, memoirs, film, and visual culture as a way of introducing students to Soviet Jewish History, from the reign of the last tsar, Nicholas II, to the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991. Special topics to be examined include: the breakup of the Pale of Settlement during the Great War; the role of Jews in revolution and revolutionary culture; Soviet nationality policy; shtetl culture; antisemitism; everyday life; the purges of the 1930s; the Jewish experience in World War II; the Holocaust; and mass emigration. (Eugene Avrutin)

HIST 433. Jews in the Diaspora

Drawing on a wide variety of primary and secondary sources - ranging from memoirs and letters to films and novels - we analyze the ways in which Jewish communities refashioned their collective and individual identities. The term diaspora refers to the relations between homeland and host nation from the perspective of those who move and to the lived experience of the communities. For hundreds of years, Jews used the concept to talk about displacement, homeland, and exile after leaving their place of "origin." This course examines the histories of Jewish diaspora communities in the modern world. Drawing on a wide variety of primary and secondary sources - ranging from memoirs and letters to films and novels - we analyze the ways in which Jewish communities refashioned their collective and individual identities in Russia, Poland, France, Germany, the Ottoman Empire, and America. Same as REL 434. (Eugene Avrutin)

HIST 472. Immigrant America

History of immigration and immigrant groups in the United States from 1830 to 1980. Covers major waves of immigration and focuses on the diverse cultural heritage, social structure, and political activism of immigrants from Europe, the Americas, and Asia. (Augusto Espiritu)

Jewish Studies

JS 201. History of Antisemitism

Studies the negative representations of Judaism and Jews from antiquity to the modern world. Topics include: Greco-Roman concepts of the Jewish religion; medieval Christian symbolization of the demonic Jew; Jews and negative attitudes to capitalism; blood purity and blood libel; the rise of racial prejudice in the modern nation state; totalitarianism and genocide; antisemitism and anti-Zionism. Same as REL 212. (Bruce Rosenstock)

JS 502. Into to Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies

This seminar will provide a graduate-level introduction to the field of Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies. We will survey some of the significant theorists of memory from the last century. Topics will include the relations between history, memory, and identity; power, politics, and contestation; media, generational change, and modes of transmission; and remembrance, justice, and globalization. Students will have the opportunity to design research projects in their own areas of interest. Requirements will include active participation, an oral presentation, one short response paper, and a final research paper. This course is recommended (but not required) for those contemplating the Certificate in Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies and will be of interest to students across a broad range of disciplines and interests including but not limited to those working on the Holocaust, the Armenian genocide, the Rwandan genocide, Cambodia, Indonesia, and/or memory and violence more generally. (Brett Kaplan)

Media and Cinema Studies

MACS 496. Screenwriting

(Sayed Kashua)

Religion

REL 101. Bible as Literature

Themes and literary genres in the Bible, emphasizing content important in Western culture. Same as CWL 111 and ENGL 114. (Richard Layton)

REL 108. Religion and Society in West I

Introduction to classic writers and texts in Western religious and social thought from antiquity to the Enlightenment, with emphasis on their social and historical contexts. Same as ANTH 108, PHIL 108, and SOC 108. (Bruce Rosenstock)

REL 110. World Religions

Survey of the leading living religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam; examination of basic texts and of philosophic theological elaborations of each religion. Same as PHIL 110. (Richard Layton)

REL 283. Jewish Sacred Literature

Literary study of the major post-biblical sacred texts of Judaism; includes readings in translation from Mishnah, Tosefta, Talmudim, midrashim, piyyutim, and mystical treatises. Emphasizes nature, history, function, and development of literary patterns and forms and the relationships between form and content in these texts. Same as CWL 283 and ENGL 283. (Dov Weiss)

REL 335. Religion in Contemp America

Examines the religious dynamics of the twenty-first century United States. Tasks will be to map the religious landscape of contemporary America, to learn something of the history of the many traditions being practiced and lived in our communities, and then to study a series of salient issues involving people of faith; the emergence of new religions, expressions of religious intolerance, religion and politics, race and religion, and religious interpretations of economics and the market. (Jonathan Ebel)

REL 416. Readings in Rabbinic Midrash

Seminar on the foundational text of Judaism- the Midrashic collections (3rd c. - 8th C.E.). We will consider the distinctiveness of Midrashic form and content, and also reflect upon the central methodological issues and problems for the study of this classic corpus. (Dov Weiss)

Russian

RUSS 465. Russian-Jewish Culture

Study of Russian-Jewish cultural, social, and political life through literature and film. No Russian required. (Harriet Murav)

Social Work

SOCW 300. Diversity, Identities & Issues

This introductory course explores multiple dimensions of diversity in a pluralistic and increasingly globalized society. Using a social work strengths perspective as well as historical, constructivist, and critical conceptual frameworks; the course examines issues of identity, culture, privilege stigma, prejudice, and discrimination. The social construction and implications of race, class, gender, sexual orientation, and other dimensions of difference is examined at individual, interpersonal, and systems levels. Students are expected to use the course material to explore their personal values, biases, family backgrounds, culture, and formative experiences in order to deepen their self-awareness and develop interpersonal skills in bridging differences. Finally, students apply learning from the course to identify characteristics of effective social work and other health and human service provision among people culturally different themselves; and to identify opportunities for change contributing to prejudice reduction and cross-cultural acceptance at home, work and in society. (Janet Carter-Black)

Yiddish

YDSH 101. Beginning Yiddish I

Course develops basic conversational and reading skills as well as the essentials of Yiddish grammar. (Sara Feldman)

YDSH 320. Lit Responses to the Holocaust

Course introduces a variety of Jewish literary responses to the Holocaust written during and after the Second World War (from 1939). The discussion of Holocaust memoirs, diaries, novels, short stories, poems, and other texts will focus on the unique contribution of literary works to our understanding of the Holocaust. In addition, the works and their authors will be situated in their Jewish cultural historical context. Taught in English translation. Same as CWL 320, ENGL 359, JS 320, and REL 320. (Jennifer Anderson-Bliss)

YDSH 420. Jewish Life-Writing

Jewish life-writing from the late 18th century until today. Emphasis on cultural historical context, literary styles, and forms. All texts will be available in English translation. Same as CWl 421, HIST 436, REL 420, SLAV 420. (Rachel Harris)

 

SPRING 2018

Communication

CMN 232. Intro to Intercultural Communication

Introduction to the study of intercultural communication in a variety of contexts, including domestic and international; examines theory and research to explain what happens when people from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds interact. Requires students to think critically about the ways in which "taken-for-granted" ways of thinking, acting, and interacting are culturally specific. This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for: Cultural Studies - Non-West, Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci (Jillian Moga)

Comparative & World Literature

CWL 202. Literature and Ideas

Analysis of several important world-views in Western civilization (such as classical, Romantic, modern, and so forth), studied comparatively and in relation to selected figures in Western literature. Prerequisite: CWL241and CWL242; or one year of college literature; or consent of instructor. This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for: Humanities - Lit & Arts, Cultural Studies - Western (Eric Calderwood)

CWL 395. Special Topics Comp Lit I

Global Comics and Graphic Novels. This course provides an overview of the study of comics and graphic narratives from around the world. How do we define comics? What can comics express that just text or just visual art cannot? What does the combination of word and image achieve? How do comics change across national contexts? Why are comics an appropriate form for narratives of trauma, disaster, memory, and childhood? These questions and more will guide our class. (Jennifer Anderson Bliss)

Education Policy Studies

EPS 310. Race and Cultural Diversity

Study of race and cultural diversity from Colonial era to present; the evolution of racial ideology in an ethnically heterogeneous society; the impact of race on the structures and operations of fundamental social institutions; the role of race in contemporary politics and popular culture. Same as AAS310, AFRO310, and LLS310. Prerequisite: Completion of campus Composition I general education requirement.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for: Advanced Composition, Cultural Studies - US Minority (James Anderson)

German

GER 261. The Holocaust in Context

Jewish contributions to German Literature from 1200 to the present day. Includes trips to the University Library's Rare Book Room. Same as CWL 273 and ENGL 269. This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for: Cultural Studies – Western, Humanities – Lit & Arts

(Peter Fritzsche)

Global Studies

GLBL 100. Intro to Global Studies

Foundation course for understanding a range of contemporary issues and learning to analyze them from multiple disciplinary perspectives. Students consider globalizing trends within themes of wealth and poverty; population, cultures, and human rights; environment and sustainability; and governance, conflict, and cooperation. Course objectives are to enhance knowledge of human cultures, their interactions and impacts on the world; develop skills for successfully negotiating realities of contemporary societies; and promote values for global learning, diversity, and sustainable futures. This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for: Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci, Cultural Studies - Western (Tim Wedig)

Hebrew

HEBR 202. Elementary Modern Hebrew II

Continuation of HEBR 201, with introduction of more advanced grammar and with emphasis on more fluency in speaking and reading. (Sara Feldman)

HEBR 404. Intermediate Modern Hebrew II

Continuation of HEBR 403. Concentration on ability to engage in reasonable fluent discourse in Hebrew, comprehensive knowledge of formal grammar, and an ability to read easy Hebrew texts. (Sara Feldman)

HEBR 406. Advanced Modern Hebrew II

Continuation of HEBR 405. Course for advanced knowledge of spoken and written standard Modern Hebrew with emphasis on Modern Hebrew literature and language, Israeli newspapers and Israeli television programs. (Sayed Kashua)

History

HIST 135. History of Islamic Middle East

Introduction to fourteen centuries of Middle East history from the rise of Islam to modern times. Examines the development of Islamic thought, and of religious, social, and political institutions, as well as the transformations of the 19th and 20th centuries, in the area consisting of Egypt, the Fertile Crescent, Arabia, Turkey, and Iran. This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for: Cultural Studies - Non-West, Humanities – Hist & Phil (Ken Cuno)

HIST 269. Jewish History Since 1700

The eighteenth and nineteenth centuries witnessed a profound transformation in Jewish life, culture and religion. During this time, Jews emerged out of their "ghettos" and enjoyed unprecedented economic and professional success. These transformations included changes in every facet of life - from occupations and residence, family life and marriage, as well as religious behavior, social integration, and political expression. Yet Jewish modernization differed from region to region and was imbued with profound contradictions and tensions. What did it mean to be a Jew in the modern world? How were Jewish identities redefined in response to the social and political opportunities, as well as the hostilities and hatreds, of the modern age? How did the Holocaust realign the political and cultural geographies of Jewish life? Same as REL 269. This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for: Cultural Studies – Western, Humanities – Hist & Phil (Eugene Avrutin)

HIST 551. Jews and Their Neighbors in Global Context

This course is an interdisciplinary graduate-level introduction to the encounter between Jews and their neighbors. It focuses on the significations and transformations of Jewishness through a wide range of recent writings by historians and cultural theorists. We will consider the pre-modern roots of the position of Judaism and Jews in Christian thought and society, but will more closely focus on the modern re-articulation of this relationship in the aftermath of the Enlightenment. Key themes will include the varied pathways of Jewish modernization, the emergence of modern Jewish political, cultural and religious formations, constructions of Jewish otherness, everyday neighborly relations, and both Jewish and non-Jewish responses to the Holocaust. Students are required to lead two seminars. The writing assignments include on short response paper and a longer critical review essay or an annotated bibliography project. The bibliography project is designed to help students prepar for preliminary examinations and/or begin preliminary background reading for a future, long-term research project. (Eugene Avrutin)

Jewish Studies

JS 495. Independent Study

Media and Cinema Studies

MACS 295. Sattire and Comedy Writing

(Sayed Kashua)

Political Science

PS. 201 US Racial and Ethnic Politics

Examines efforts by racial and ethnic communities to organize politically and by society to allocate resources based on race or ethnicity. Topical focus includes African Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans, Native Americans, and white ethnics. The primary goal of the course is to develop a more comprehensive understanding of racial and ethnic politics by identifying commonalities and differences among these groups and their relationship to the state. Same as AAS201, AFRO201, and LLS201. This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for: Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci, Cultural Studies - US Minority (Cara Wong)

Psychology

PSYC 207. Psychology of Prejudice and Discrimination

Examines the psychological causes and social consequences of prejudice and discrimination in society. Learn about the current state of prejudice and discrimination in the U.S., empirical methods for studying prejudice and discrimination, and psychological interventions for reducing prejudice and discrimination. Topics include stereotyping, cognitive biases, group conflict, ideology, implicit associations, subtle and benevolent forms of prejudice, and microaggressions. This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for: Social & Beh Sci - Beh Sci (Andrea Miller)

PSYC 308. Psychology of Religion and Spirituality

Examines major topics in the psychology of religion and spirituality to promote reflection on how religion shapes attitudes, behavior, and contemporary U.S. society. Through the lens of psychology, we explore questions such as: Why are some people religious and spiritual? How do we study religion and spirituality from a psychological perspective? What do religion and spirituality look like across the lifespan? Does religion shape prejudice, morality, violence, or altruism? What is the role of religion in promoting health? Overall, we will examine these and other questions to promote greater understanding regarding the role of religion and spirituality in the lives of individuals and larger society. Same asREL308. Prerequisite: PSYC100 or equivalent. (Nathan Todd)

Religion

REL 109. Religion and Society in the West II

Introduction to classic writers and texts in Western religious and social thought from the Enlightenment to the present, with emphasis on their social and historical contexts. Same as ANTH 109, PHIL 109, and SOC 109.This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for: Cultural Studies – Western, Humanities – Hist & Phil (Bruce Rosenstock)

REL 110. World Religions

Survey of the leading living religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam; examination of basic texts and of philosophic theological elaborations of each religion. Same as PHIL 110. This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for: Cultural Studies - Non-West, Cultural Studies – Western, Humanities – Hist & Phil

REL 120. A History of Judaism

Conceptions of the Holy-Man and His Holiness within the Judaic tradition: the Man of God, the worldly Scribe, the Philosopher-king, Holiness through the heart, the mind and the law, Holiness through study, Holy Land, Holy Tradition, and the New Holy Man. Same as HIST 168. This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for: Advanced Composition, Humanities – Hist & Phil (Dov Weiss)

REL 205. Intensive Biblical Hebrew

Acquisition of reading knowledge of biblical Hebrew and a familiarity with all major aspects of biblical Hebrew grammar. Same as HEBR 205. (Bruce Rosenstock)

REL 344. Medieval Jewish Thought

Study of the distinctive religious ideas, movements, and figures of Medieval Judaism [500 CE-1700 CE]. Topics include theology, philosophy, Talmudic and Biblical exegesis, mysticism, Jewish-Christian polemics, and law. Emphasis will be placed not only on content and form, but also on historical and social context. Same as MDVL 344. (Dov Weiss)

Social Work

SOCW 300. Diversity: Identities & Issues

This introductory course explores multiple dimensions of diversity in a pluralistic and increasingly globalized society. Using a social work strengths perspective as well as historical, constructivist, and critical conceptual frameworks; the course examines issues of identity, culture, privilege stigma, prejudice, and discrimination. The social construction and implications of race, class, gender, sexual orientation, and other dimensions of difference is examined at individual, interpersonal, and systems levels. Students are expected to use the course material to explore their personal values, biases, family backgrounds, culture, and formative experiences in order to deepen their self-awareness and develop interpersonal skills in bridging differences. Finally, students apply learning from the course to identify characteristics of effective social work and other health and human service provision among people culturally different themselves; and to identify opportunities for change contributing to prejudice reduction and cross-cultural acceptance at home, work and in society. This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for: Advanced Composition, Cultural Studies - US Minority (Janet Carter-Black)

Sociology

Soc. 225 Race and Ethnicity

Sociological and social-psychological analysis of minority groups; illustrative material drawn from representative racial, ethnic, and status groups. Prerequisite: SOC100, SOC101, OR SOC163. This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for: Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci, Cultural Studies - US Minority (Ghassan Moussawi)

Yiddish

YDSH 102. Beginning Yiddish II

Continuation of YDSH 101 focusing on comprehension and reading skills. Prerequisite: YDSH 101.. (Sara Feldman)