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Fall 2016 | Course Offerings

Anthropology

ANTH 277. Ancient Cities, Sacred Land

Examines urban development from its origins to the present day. Among the concepts covered are urbanism, urbanization, ceremonial centers and ceremonial cities, the city as a system, the spatial and economic organization of cities, and the built environment (sacred landscapes, vernacular architecture, places of power). Small field project is conducted in Champaign-Urbana. (Tim Pauketatl)

Comparative & World Literature

CWL 221. Jewish Storytelling

Course will introduce the great Jewish storytellers such as Nachman of Bratslav, Scholem-Aleichem, and I.B. Singer through readings of Yiddish tales, short stories, poetry, drama and excerpts from novels and autobiographies from the 19th and 20th centuries. In addition, Yiddish films and folklore will be used to exemplify the variety of Jewish cultural expression in Eastern Europe, Russia, and America. Course will also present a sample of critical approaches to Yiddish literature. Taught in English translation Same as ENGL 223, RLST 220 and YDSH 220. (Rachael Harris)

CWL 271. The Holocaust in Context - ACP

Jewish contributions to German Literature from 1200 to the present day. Includes trips to the University Library's Rare Book Room. Same as ENGL 268 and GER 260. (Petra Watzke)

CWL 320. Lit Responses to the Holocaust

Course introduces a variety of Jewish literary responses to the Holocaust written during and after the Second World War (from 1939). The discussion of Holocaust memoirs, diaries, novels, short stories, poems, and other texts will focus on the unique contribution of literary works to our understanding of the Holocaust. In addition, the works and their authors will be situated in their Jewish cultural historical context. Taught in English translation. Same as ENGL 359, RLST 320 and YDSH 320. (Jennifer Anderson Bliss)

CWL 571. Seminar in Literary Relations (Memory, Time and Modernism)

Investigation of the impact of one literature upon another, or of some specific works upon others (the role of English literature in continental Europe, the influence of Russian novelists on French and German writers, etc. (Harriet Murav). Click heading for more info on this course.

German

GER 260. The Holocaust in Context - ACP

Jewish contributions to German Literature from 1200 to the present day. Includes trips to the University Library's Rare Book Room. Same as CWL 271. (Petra Watzke)

Hebrew

HEBR 201. Elementary Modern Hebrew I

Acquaints students with the fundamental principles of the Hebrew language. Develops all four language skills; reading, writing, listening and speaking. Grammar and comprehension are exercised through the textbook, the audio-visual materials and the computer. Easy stories will be used during the term to strengthen reading comprehension. Participation in the language laboratory is required. (Sara Feldman)

HEBR 205. Intensive Biblical Hebrew

Acquisition of reading knowledge of biblical Hebrew and a familiarity with all major aspects of biblical Hebrew grammar. Same as RLST 205. (Bruce Rosenstock)

HEBR 403. Intermediate Modern Hebrew I

Advanced examination of the fundamental principles of the Hebrew language. Develops all four language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. Grammar and comprehension are exercised through the textbooks, the audio-visual materials and the computer. Examples of Hebrew fiction, largely easy stories, will be used during the term to strengthen reading comprehension. Participation in the language laboratory is required. (Sarah Feldman)

HEBR 405. Advanced Modern Hebrew I

For students who have mastered the fundamental principles of the Hebrew language. Develops competence through reading Hebrew fiction and studying Israeli newspapers and television programs. Communication skills are exercised by means of class discussions, oral presentations, compositions and written reports on stories. (Sayed Kashua)

History

HIST 252. The Holocaust

Exploration of the Holocaust in historical perspective by examining European anti-Semitism, political developments in Germany, the rise to power of the Nazis, and the origins of the Holocaust with first-hand accounts, films, and historical texts, concluding with the legacy of the Holocaust in the contemporary world. (Peter Fritzsche)

HIST 335. Middle East 1566-1914

Political, social, cultural, and ideological developments in Egypt, Arabia, the Fertile Crescent, Iran and Turkey from the mid 16th century to the eve of World War I. Premodern society and institutions, the question of "decline" and "awakening", encounters with Europe and self-strengthening reforms, relations between Muslims, Christians, and Jews, the role of women and the family, class formation, and religion and nationalism. (Ken Cuno)

HIST 432. History of Early Judaism

The history of Judaism from Ezra to the rise of Islam: Hellenism and Judaism, varieties of Judaism, Palestinian Judaism and its documents, Babylonian Judaism, the rabbis, and popular Jewish culture. Same as RLST 442 (Dov Weiss)

HIST 495/498D. Family in History

Meets with HIST 495, Section D. Topic: Family in History. Description: The family is in flux. The legalization of same-sex marriage in a number of countries is the latest in a series of developments since the mid-twentieth century that have re-shaped family ideology and family life itself in much of the world. However, there never was a "traditional family" to be undone. Instead, there was an older family ideal, only occasionally realized in practice, which was invented two centuries earlier. In this course we will be surveying historic Euro-American family ideals and practices, their export to the non-Western world, and recent developments from no-fault divorce to same-sex marriage. In addition to readings and discussions, students will research and present on a topic related to the family in history - as practiced, as idealized, as legislated, and so on.. Same as RLST 434. (Ken Cuno)

Jewish Studies

JS 199. Undergraduate Open Seminar

Faculty offer seminars in a range of areas that provide an opportunity for undergraduates to be exposed to key dimensions of Jewish Studies. (Dana Rabin)

Religion

RLST 108. Religion and Society in the West I

Introduction to classic writers and texts in Western religious and social thought from antiquity to the Enlightenment, with emphasis on their social and historical contexts.. Same as ANTH 108, PHIL 108, and SOC 108. (Bruce Rosenstock)

RLST 110. World Religions

Survey of the leading living religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam; examination of basic texts and of philosophic theological elaborations of each religion. Same as PHIL 110. (Dov Weiss)

RLST 205. Intensive Biblical Hebrew

Acquisition of reading knowledge of biblical Hebrew and a familiarity with all major aspects of biblical Hebrew grammar. Same as HEBR 205. (Bruce Rosenstock)

RLST 442. HIstory of Early Judaism

The history of Judaism from Ezra to the rise of Islam: Hellenism and Judaism, varieties of Judaism, Palestinian Judaism and its documents, Babylonian Judaism, the rabbis and popular Jewish culture. Same as HIST 432. (Dov Weiss)

RLST 496. Topics in HIstory of Judaism

Independent Study.

RLST 504. Genesis in History

Survey of Jewish and Christian cultural reception of Genesis in the ancient and medieval worlds. Examines techniques of exegesis and strategies of interpretation in the ancient world, such as allegory, narrative expansion and retelling. Engages with foundational studies of modern scholarship on biblical reception. while focusing on the initial chapters of Genesis, we will also explore the appropriation of Abraham traditions and the Josph story. Same as MDVL 504 (Richard Layton)

Social Work

SOCW 300. Diversity: Identities & Issues

This introductory course explores multiple dimensions of diversity in a pluralistic and increasingly globalized society. Using a social work strengths perspective as well as historical, constructivist, and critical conceptual frameworks; the course examines issues of identity, culture, privilege stigma, prejudice, and discrimination. The social construction and implications of race, class, gender, sexual orientation, and other dimensions of difference is examined at individual, interpersonal, and systems levels. Students are expected to use the course material to explore their personal values, biases, family backgrounds, culture, and formative experiences in order to deepen their self-awareness and develop interpersonal skills in bridging differences. Finally, students apply learning from the course to identify characteristics of effective social work and other health and human service provision among people culturally different themselves; and to identify opportunities for change contributing to prejudice reduction and cross-cultural acceptance at home, work and in society. (Janet Carter-Black)

SOCW 473. Immigration, Health & Society

This interdisciplinary seminar examines the social determinants of US racial and ethnic health inequalities through the lens of (im)migration. Topics to be addressed include: conceptualizations of race and ethnicity, immigrant-adaptation theories, discrimination, place, and the intersections of race, ethnicity, poverty, immigration, gender and health. Same as CHLH 473, LLS 473 and SOC 473. (Edna Viruell-Fuentes)

Yiddish

YDSH 103. Intermediate Yiddish I

Continuation of YDSH 102 Developes more advanced conversational, comprehension, reading and writing skills as well as introducing more advanced features of Yiddish grammar.Prerequisite: YDSH 102 or equivalent placement score. (Sara Feldman)

YDSH 220. Jewish Storytelling

Course will introduce the great Jewish storytellers such as Nachman of Bratslav, Scholem-Aleichem, and I.B. Singer through readings of Yiddish tales, short stories, poetry, drama and excerpts from novels and autobiographies from the 19th and 20th centuries. In addition, Yiddish films and folklore will be used to exemplify the variety of Jewish cultural expression in Eastern Europe, Russia, and America. Course will also present a sample of critical approaches to Yiddish literature. Taught in English translation.Same as CWL 221, ENGL 223 and RLST 220. (Rachel Harris)

YDSH 320. Lit Responses to the Holocaust

Course introduces a variety of Jewish literary responses to the Holocaust written during and after the Second World War (from 1939). The discussion of Holocaust memoirs, diaries, novels, short stories, poems, and other texts will focus on the unique contribution of literary works to our understanding of the Holocaust. In addition, the works and their authors will be situated in their Jewish cultural historical context. Taught in English translation Same as CWL 320, ENGL 359 and RLST 320. (Bliss J. Anderson)