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Fall 2017 Course Offerings

Comparative & World Literature

CWL 111: BIBLE AS LITERATURE

Themes and literary genres in the Bible, emphasizing content important in Western culture. Same as ENGL 114 and REL 101. (Richard Layton)

This course satisfies the General Education Criteria in Fall 2017 for a UIUC: Literature and the Artscourse

CWL 320: LIT RESPONSES TO THE HOLOCAUST

Course introduces a variety of Jewish literary responses to the Holocaust written during and after the Second World War (from 1939). The discussion of Holocaust memoirs, diaries, novels, short stories, poems, and other texts will focus on the unique contribution of literary works to our understanding of the Holocaust. In addition, the works and their authors will be situated in their Jewish cultural historical context. Taught in English translation. Same as JS 320, REL 320, YDSH 320 and ENGL 359. (Jennifer Anderson Bliss)

This course satisfies the General Education Criteria in Fall 2017 for a UIUC: Literature and the Arts course , and UIUC: Western Compartv Cultcourse

CWL 395/JS399: TERRORISM IN FICTION AND FILM

Same as JS 399. (Rachel Harris)

CWL 421: JEWISH LIFE-WRITING

Jewish life-writing from the late 18th century until today. Emphasis on cultural historical context, literary styles, and forms. All texts will be available in English translation. Same as HIST 436, REL 420, SLAV 420, YDSH 420. (Rachel Harris)

Hebrew

HEBR 201:  ELEMENTARY MODERN HEBREW I                                  

Acquaints students with the fundamental principles of the Hebrew language. Develops all four language skills; reading, writing, listening and speaking. Grammar and comprehension are exercised through the textbook, the audio-visual materials and the computer. Easy stories will be used during the term to strengthen reading comprehension. Participation in the language laboratory is required. (Sara Feldman)

HEBR 403:  INTERMEDIATE MODERN HEBREW I                             

Advanced examination of the fundamental principles of the Hebrew language. Develops all four language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. Grammar and comprehension are exercised through the textbooks, the audio-visual materials and the computer. Examples of Hebrew fiction, largely easy stories, will be used during the term to strengthen reading comprehension. Participation in the language laboratory is required. (Sara Feldman)

History

HIST 252/JS 252:  THE HOLOCAUST                                                                    

Exploration of the Holocaust in historical perspective by examining European anti-Semitism, political developments in Germany, the rise to power of the Nazis, and the origins of the Holocaust with first-hand accounts, films, and historical texts, concluding with the legacy of the Holocaust in the contemporary world. (Peter Fritzsche) 

This course satisfies the General Education Criteria in Fall 2017 for a UIUC: Hist&Philosoph Perspectcourse , and UIUC: Western Compartv Cultcourse

HIST 355: SOVIET JEWISH HISTORY

An examination of how Jewish life and culture contributed to the creation of the world's first socialist society. Makes use of primary sources, scholarly essays and monographs, archival documents, literature, memoirs, film, and visual culture as a way of introducing students to Soviet Jewish History, from the reign of the last tsar, Nicholas II, to the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991. Special topics to be examined include: the breakup of the Pale of Settlement during the Great War; the role of Jews in revolution and revolutionary culture; Soviet nationality policy; shtetl culture; antisemitism; everyday life; the purges of the 1930s; the Jewish experience in World War II; the Holocaust; and mass emigration. (Gene Avrutin) 

HIST 433: JEWS IN THE DIASPORA

Drawing on a wide variety of primary and secondary sources - ranging from memoirs and letters to films and novels - we analyze the ways in which Jewish communities refashioned their collective and individual identities. (Gene Avrutin)  

HIST 472: IMMIGRANT AMERICA                                                             

The goal of this course is to provide a survey of immigration history in the United States, the global forces shaping migration, and the questions of assimilation, citizenship, race, ethnicity, and gender in American life. (Augusto Espiritu)

Jewish Studies

JS 201: HISTORY OF ANTISEMITISM

The "History of Antisemitism" examines the negative representations of Judaism and the Jewish people within the larger context of the major historical changes taking place in the ancient Mediterranean worls, medieval European civilization, and the rise of the modern nation state. We will study a wide variety of texts, from Greek and Latin historical writing to Gospel narratives, theological treatises of the Church Fathers, medieval passion plays, saint's legends, Enlightenment philosophy, nineteenth-century racist pamphlets, and Nazi propaganda. We will also study antisemitic themes in film and contemporary social media.Same as REL 212. (Bruce Rosenstock)

JS 502/CWL 581: INTRODUCTION TO HOLOCAUST, GENOCIDE AND MEMORY STUDIES

Introduction to Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies, Brett Ashley Kaplan This seminar will provide a graduate-level introduction to the field of Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies. We will survey some of the significant theorists of memory from the last century. Topics will include the relations between history, memory, and identity; power, politics, and contestation; media, generational change, and modes of transmission; and remembrance, justice, and globalization. Students will have the opportunity to design research projects in their own areas of interest. Requirements will include active participation, an oral presentation, one short response paper, and a final research paper. This course is recommended (but not required) for those contemplating the Certificate in Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies and will be of interest to students across a broad range of disciplines and interests including but not limited to those working on the Holocaust, the Armenian genocide, the Rwandan genocide, Cambodia, Indonesia, and/or memory and violence more generally. The time, day, and exact content of the course are now being worked out so, if you are considering taking the seminar please send me an email detailing when would be a good time/day, what topics you are interested in covering and, if you have a sense, which theorists/texts you would like to discuss.Same as CWL 581. (Brett Kaplan)

Media and Cinema Studies

MACS 496:SCREENWRITING

Same as CW 463. (Sayed Kashua)   

Religion

REL 108: RELIGION & SOCIETY IN WEST I

Introduction to classic writers and texts in Western religious and social thought from antiquity to the Enlightenment, with emphasis on their social and historical contexts.Same as ANTH 108, JS 108, PHIL 108, SOC 108. (Bruce Rosenstock)    

This course satisfies the General Education Criteria in Fall 2017 for a UIUC: Hist&Philosoph Perspectcourse, and UIUC: Western Compartv Cultcourse

REL110: WORLD RELIGIONS

Survey of the leading living religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam; examination of basic texts and of philosophic theological elaborations of each religion. Same as PHIL 110. (Richard Layton)  

This course satisfies the General Education Criteria in Fall 2017 for a UIUC: Non-Western Culturescourse, and UIUC: Hist&Philosoph Perspectcourse, and UIUC: Western Compartv Cultcourse

REL 283: JEWISH SACRED LITERATURE

Literary study of the major post-biblical sacred texts of Judaism; includes readings in translation from Mishnah, Tosefta, Talmudim, midrashim, piyyutim, and mystical treatises. Emphasizes nature, history, function, and development of literary patterns and forms and the relationships between form and content in these texts.Same as ENGL 283 and CWL 283. (Dov Weiss)

This course satisfies the General Education Criteria in Fall 2017 for a UIUC: Literature and the Artscourse

REL 335: RELIGION IN CONTEMPORARY AMERICA

Examines the religious dynamics of the twenty-first century United States. Tasks will be to map the religious landscape of contemporary America, to learn something of the history of the many traditions being practiced and lived in our communities, and then to study a series of salient issues involving people of faith; the emergence of new religions, expressions of religious intolerance, religion and politics, race and religion, and religious interpretations of economics and the market. (Jonathan Ebel)   

REL 416: READINGS IN RABBINIC MIDRASH

Seminar on the foundational text of Judaism- the Midrashic collections (3rd c. - 8th C.E.). We will consider the distinctiveness of Midrashic form and content, and also reflect upon the central methodological issues and problems for the study of this classic corpus. (Dov Weiss)   

Russian

RUSS 465: RUSSIAN-CULTURE

Study of Russian-Jewish cultural, social, and political life through literature and film. No Russian required. (Harriett Murav)  

Social Work

SOCW 300: DIVERSITY: IDENTITIES & ISSUES

This introductory course explores multiple dimensions of diversity in a pluralistic and increasingly globalized society. Using a social work strengths perspective as well as historical, constructivist, and critical conceptual frameworks; the course examines issues of identity, culture, privilege stigma, prejudice, and discrimination. The social construction and implications of race, class, gender, sexual orientation, and other dimensions of difference is examined at individual, interpersonal, and systems levels. Students are expected to use the course material to explore their personal values, biases, family backgrounds, culture, and formative experiences in order to deepen their self-awareness and develop interpersonal skills in bridging differences. Finally, students apply learning from the course to identify characteristics of effective social work and other health and human service provision among people culturally different themselves; and to identify opportunities for change contributing to prejudice reduction and cross-cultural acceptance at home, work and in society. (Janet Carter-Black)  

This course satisfies the General Education Criteria in Fall 2017 for a UIUC: US Minority Culture(s)course, and UIUC: Advanced Compositioncourse

Yiddish

YDSH 101: BEGINNING YIDDISH I

Course develops basic conversational and reading skills as well as the essentials of Yiddish grammar. (Sara Feldman)